Living with Less: The Nostalgia Edition

I grew up thinking that in order to remember something, I had to hold on to it. This cluttered my shelves with boxes of ticket stubs, old CD’s, porcelain cats on cats on cats, and so much more. But with each item came a memory, and I was terrified to let it go, thinking that it somehow meant I didn’t value that memory any more. Then I read this article on one of our favorite blogs, and something clicked.

While I may seem crazy for parting with a faceless man holding a tooth by a string, JD and I "both" agreed it was time.
While I may seem crazy for parting with a faceless man holding a tooth by a string, JD and I “both” agreed that I could remember that my Grandpa was a dentist without it.

It wasn’t that my rusty nail collection really resonated with me as a 20-something, it was that I had placed meaning in those nails instead of the actual memories of my sister and I scouring my grandparent’s old farm sheds for treasure to proudly display on our shelves. Once I came to terms with that, I’m happy to report that I have maintained the memories of our family trip to Mount Rushmore just fine without the cornhusk doll and unicorn windchime (cue JD’s praise hands).

Who doesn't want to dump salt onto their steak through the gilded horns of a porcelain cow?
Who doesn’t want to dump salt onto their steak through the gilded horns of a porcelain cow? Amazingly, I still remember that my family and I had dinner together every night without these beauties.

JD and I have moved seven times in four years and each time I have gotten rid of a little more me and gained a little more us. It’s not that I don’t hold on to little mementos anymore. I’m perfectly happy with three Celine Dion mugs to commemorate a few of my trips with Dad, but I’m more careful about where I place my value, and that’s helped me view my memories as what they are — so much more than trinkets.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s